1. archatlas:

The Dali Museum Stair Nathan Petit

    archatlas:

    The Dali Museum Stair Nathan Petit

    Reblogged from: 336bc
  2. effeytrinket:

    "Perfect is very boring, and if you happen to have a different look, that’s a celebration of human nature, I think. If we were all symmetrical and perfect, life would be very dull."  ― Natalie Dormer

    Reblogged from: grelleybeans
  3. Reblogged from: grelleybeans
  4. anghraine:

    A rare season 2 promo of Cesare and Lucrezia (X)

    she’s still got her seahorse necklace lolol i love how evil she looks hehehe *mourns villain lucrezia* if your arc was only as good as your promotional shots suggested *sigh*

    Reblogged from: anghraine
  5. Do not read as children do to enjoy themselves, or, as the ambitious do to educate themselves. No, read to live.
    Gustave Flaubert
  6. heaven-ly-mind:

Aurora Road by Philip Eaglesfield on 500px
    Reblogged from: scandinaviapictures
  7. a-lie-like-us:

Berlepsch Castle, Göttingen, Germany 

    a-lie-like-us:

    Berlepsch Castle, Göttingen, Germany 

    Reblogged from: thistroubledmindofmine
  8. 
mythology meme:  [6/8] myths, legends, and stories
↳ izanagi no mikoto and izanami no mikoto

Part of the Japanese creation myth, the story of Izanagi and Izanami tells of the birth of the eight great Japanese islands (at least the ones that were part of ancient Japan). Izanagi and Izanami played a part in both Kamiumi and Kuniumi, the birth of the gods and the birth of the lands.
Of the seventh and last generation of the great Kamiyonayo, Izanami and Izanagi would be responsible for both the birth of the Japanese islands as well as the birth of other gods, who’d later become deities. Although the beginning of their union was rocky, they succeeded. They had a great many children, but during the birth of Kagutsuchi, the god of fire, Izanami died from the severe burns. Izanagi killed Kagutsuchi and descended into Yomi, the underworld, to plead for his wife’s return. 
He found Izanami, but she stayed in the shadows of Yomi and told him she’d already eaten the food of the underworld and therefore belonged with the dead. However, Izanagi refused to take ‘no’ for an answer and after long negotiations, Izanami asked for a night’s rest before she returned to the world of the living with her husband, and warned him not to come to her bedroom. After waiting a long time, Izanagi got curious and entered the room. Using a comb from his hair, he made it into a torch, and in the beam of light he saw his once beautiful wife’s rotting and horrid form. Terrified, Izanagi fled while Izanami sent shikome after him. Eventually, Izanagi managed to exit Yomi, and rolled a large stone in front of its entrance. Izanami yelled from behind the stone that she’d kill a thousand people every day since he’d abandoned her. Izanagi answered that he’d give life to a thousand and five hundred. 

    mythology meme:  [6/8] myths, legends, and stories

    ↳ izanagi no mikoto and izanami no mikoto

    Part of the Japanese creation myth, the story of Izanagi and Izanami tells of the birth of the eight great Japanese islands (at least the ones that were part of ancient Japan). Izanagi and Izanami played a part in both Kamiumi and Kuniumi, the birth of the gods and the birth of the lands.

    Of the seventh and last generation of the great Kamiyonayo, Izanami and Izanagi would be responsible for both the birth of the Japanese islands as well as the birth of other gods, who’d later become deities. Although the beginning of their union was rocky, they succeeded. They had a great many children, but during the birth of Kagutsuchi, the god of fire, Izanami died from the severe burns. Izanagi killed Kagutsuchi and descended into Yomi, the underworld, to plead for his wife’s return.

    He found Izanami, but she stayed in the shadows of Yomi and told him she’d already eaten the food of the underworld and therefore belonged with the dead. However, Izanagi refused to take ‘no’ for an answer and after long negotiations, Izanami asked for a night’s rest before she returned to the world of the living with her husband, and warned him not to come to her bedroom. After waiting a long time, Izanagi got curious and entered the room. Using a comb from his hair, he made it into a torch, and in the beam of light he saw his once beautiful wife’s rotting and horrid form. Terrified, Izanagi fled while Izanami sent shikome after him. Eventually, Izanagi managed to exit Yomi, and rolled a large stone in front of its entrance. Izanami yelled from behind the stone that she’d kill a thousand people every day since he’d abandoned her. Izanagi answered that he’d give life to a thousand and five hundred. 

    Reblogged from: charlesmmacaulay
  9. 
 Guarino Guarini, Dome of the Church of San Lorenzo (1634–1687), Turin.

    Guarino Guarini, Dome of the Church of San Lorenzo (1634–1687), Turin.

    Reblogged from: ancient-serpent
  10. metaphorwaters:

    Max Irons for ASOS magazine

    Reblogged from: metaphorwaters
  11. 
(by phoebeagle)

    (by phoebeagle)

    Reblogged from: teacoffeebooks
  12. collections that are raw as fuck ➝ zuhair murad s/s 2013

    Reblogged from: charlesmmacaulay
  13. animamusicale:

    "Like Real People Do"  |  Hozier

    Reblogged from: mythandrists
Next

live, observe, think, and feel

Paper theme built by Thomas